Green Bay Packers Updated 2021 NFL Draft Meeting Tracker & What to Know

A few weeks ago, I published an article tracking all of the reported pre-draft meetings that the Green Bay Packers have had with 2021 NFL Draft prospects. Without a doubt, there were others, but these were the ones we knew about–and you can find that article here.

These pre-draft visits are an important part of the draft process as it gives teams the opportunity to have a real conversation with the player, pick their brains, and get to know them a little bit both on and off the field.

Over the last few weeks, there have been several other confirmed meetings between prospects and the Green Bay Packers, so I wanted to update the list with a new version of the ‘2021 NFL Draft Meeting Tracker.’

Here is a look at who the Green Bay Packers have met with recently, what you need to know about them, and what draft analysts are saying about their games.

Tommy Tremble, TE, Notre Dame

Tommy Tremble has 35 career receptions on 52 targets, averaging 11.5 yards per catch with four touchdowns. At Notre Dame, he was a do-it-all tight end, lining up all over the formation, and according to Pro Football Focus ($), “there was not a better run-blocking tight end in all of football last year.” Similar to Josiah Deguara, he’s the type of tight end that works really well in the Matt LaFleur offense.

“He blocks like his life depends on it snap after snap. Notre Dame used him all over the formation, and he continuously got the job done. Pair that with legit speed and you’ve got the makings of an interesting prospect.” – PFF

Teven Jenkins, OT, Oklahoma State

A very experienced player out of Oklahoma State, Jenkins has almost 2,700 career snaps over 37 games. Over the last two seasons, he hasn’t allowed a sack and only 11 pressures. He was also the third-highest run-blocking offensive tackle by PFF’s grading system in 2020.

“A well above average finisher, Jenkins is the type of offensive lineman that attempts to humiliate players in the opposite color jersey. The echo of the whistle doesn’t slow down his process and he continues on with his process until he wants to conclude.” – Jordan Reid TDN

Zaven Collins, LB, Tulsa

At 6’4″ – 260 pounds, Collins has that traditional linebacker size but the athleticism to match. He is effective in coverage, as a blitzer, and against the run. In 2020 he came away with four interceptions and a pass breakup, forced 16 pressures, four of which were sacks, and recorded eight tackles for loss.

“Whether it’s defending the run, dropping into coverage, or rushing the passer, Collins has the requisite skill set required to execute and was arguably the most dynamic defensive playmaker in college football for the 2020 season. He demonstrated notable growth in 2020, becoming a complete defender and making high-impact, clutch plays seemingly every week.” – Joe Marino TDN

Ambry Thomas, CB, Michigan

At 6’0″ – 182 pounds, Thomas is a one-year starter at Michigan during the 2019 season and opted-out of 2020. That year he was targeted 47 times, allowing a completion rate of 53.2 percent and 13.3 yards per catch. He came away with three interceptions, three pass breakups, and a passer rating of 56.3 when targeted. Thomas can be a special teams contributor as well, as a return man.

“Thomas was most effective in coverage playing in press and disrupting route releases inside the contact window—he’s a physical player who does well when able to get his hands on the receiver and upset the timing of patterns. Thomas also flashes quite a bit in shallow spaces as a flat defender in zone coverage; showcasing good awareness of plays developing underneath to drive back to the football.” – Kyle Crabbs TDN

Demetric Felton RB/WR, UCLA

Felton is a do-it-all prospect that would be a great fit in the Matt LaFleur offense as that gadgety-type player. This past season at UCLA, he averaged 5.1 yards per carry with five touchdowns as a running back, but he also has 132 career targets in the passing game, catching 74 percent of them. Felton can line up in the backfield, in the slot, or out wide.

“He’s been effective in the run game when used on the perimeter. He runs with the inclination to get outside and use elusiveness and wiggle In space. In the passing game, he is very good due to his effectiveness with the ball in his hands.” – Drae Harris TDN

Braden Jaimes, OL, Nebraska

If you want to talk about experienced players, here is an experienced player. Jaimes made an incredible 40 consecutive starts to end his Nebraska career, playing 2,196 snaps at left tackle and 629 at right tackle in 2017. Over the last two seasons, he has allowed just two sacks and 13 pressures.

“In the run game, he is strong and stout at the point of attack. He does a good job of getting his feet in the neutral zone and getting vertical movement. He also shows adequate athleticism in his pass set…I believe he could maximize his potential at guard or even suffice at right tackle in the NFL.” – Drae Harris TDN

Ifeatu Melifonwu, CB, Syracuse

Melifonwu has the size that NFL teams dream about at the cornerback position, listed at 6’3″ – 213 pounds while also posting a score of 9.57 out of 10 on the Relative Athletic Scoring table. He’s a two-year starter at Syracuse, tallying two sacks and allowing a completion rate in coverage of 54.4 percent on 101 targets. Melifonwu also recorded three interceptions, 15 pass breakups, and a passer rating of 80.9.

At the next level, his best fit is as a zone corner where his length, ball skills, ability to read the backfield, and leverage routes shine. He is also an above-average run defender and can be relied upon to make tackles should his 2020 campaign be the norm moving forward. He does have some appeal in press-man coverage where his physicality, quick feet, and length are assets.” – Joe Marino TDN

Trevon Moehrig, DB, TCU

Listed as a safety, but Moehrig is an extremely versatile defender. Over the last two years, Moehrig took 441 snaps in the box, another 683 in the slot, and 341 as the free safety, according to Pro Football Focus. During that span, he would also record 104 tackles, a completion rate of 51 percent on 88 targets, six interceptions, and 20 pass breakups.

“No safety in college football has made more plays on the ball over the past two seasons than Moehrig. He led all safeties in pass breakups in both 2019 (12) and 2020 (eight). You already see his size (6-foot-2, 202 pounds) and length come into play — he can get all the way to the catch point closing in from behind receivers.” – PFF

JaCoby Stevens, S, LSU

Stevens is another experienced player, having appeared in over 35 games in his career. At the line of scrimmage, he tallied 34 pressures, including 10 sacks and 157 tackles. In coverage, Stevens came away with four interceptions, 11 pass breakups, and a completion rate of 66.3 percent when targeted.

“Stevens brings terrific size to the table and he has some impressive reps playing closer to the line of scrimmage where he can function in condensed areas of the field and trigger downhill. In coverage, Stevens is physical and capable of redirecting routes with his willingness to crowd routes and be aggressive.” – Joe Marino TDN

John Raine, TE/FB, Northwestern

A very Green Bay Packers-type of player, Raine can line up in the backfield, inline, or in the slot, has been effective in the passing game, and ranked 30th out of 200 tight ends in PFF’s pass-blocking grading system. Raine has 117 career targets, has caught nearly 70 percent of them at 9.5 yards per catch with nine touchdowns.

“Raine was a solid tight end for Northwestern and was effective in all areas of the position. He possesses marginal size and speed for the next level, but he can be used as a third tight end or line up as an occasional H-back.” – Tony Pauline PFN

Evan McPherson, K, Florida

That’s right; the Green Bay Packers have reportedly met with a kicker. Over his career, McPherson has made 149 of his 150 extra-point attempts and 51 of his 60 field goal attempts. He’s five of eight from 50 yards or more and 11 of 15 in the 40 to 49-yard range.

Rachad Wildgoose, CB, Wisconsin

Wildgoose was Wisconsin’s primary slot cornerback in 2019, and the year before that, he took a majority of his snaps on the boundary–so plenty of experience both inside and out. He was targeted 118 times over his career, allowing a completion rate of 53.4 percent and 12.2 yards per catch. Wildgoose also has one interception and 12 pass breakups over his career.

“Wildgoose Jr. has shared time between the perimeter and nickel, the latter of which is where I will like him most at the pro level. Coming out of Jim Leonhard’s defensive system, Wildgoose Jr. should offer an NFL team a smart, savvy defensive presence even without the extensive game tape to back it up.” – Kyle Crabbs TDN